Wild Fennel Pollen

Wild Fennel Pollen: At Beechwood Inn we try to use as many fresh and local products as possible.  However, we also want our guests to experience a world of flavors.  Therefore, we source exotic products from unique sources from around the world. Have you tried Wild Fennel Pollen?

Wild Fennel Pollen

At Beechwood Inn we try to use as many fresh and local products as possible.  However, we also want our guests to experience a world of flavors.  Therefore, we source exotic products from unique sources from around the world. Have you tried Wild Fennel Pollen?

The flavor lies somewhere between the muskiness of sage, the bright bite of anise and the floral delicacy and slight bitterness of saffron. In an article for Saveur magazine, Peggy Knickerbocker wrote, “If angels sprinkled a spice from their wings, this would be it.”  The flavor of Wild Fennel Pollen is incredible, like taking the fennel seed, sweetening it and then intensifying it a hundred times.

Tuscans traditionally used wild fennel pollen on pork, but modern chefs use it’s unique flavor on a broad array of foods.  At Beechwood Inn we use it on tomatoes, in rice, on salmon and quail – and of course on pork.  It makes a rich cream sauce to use with pan seared scallops. Wild Fennel Pollen acts not just as a flavoring agent but as a flavor booster, instantly amping-up a dish’s umami—that deep savoriness and intensity that chefs struggle mightily to develop. We buy organic fennel pollen by a big 7 ounce bag from Franconi.

Wild Fennel Pollen is harvested by hand. To prevent spoliage, the pollen is dried. This process begins on large wooden slabs under the sun. The still moist powder is spread on these boards and left to dry for 7 – 10 days. After most of the moisture dissipates, the pollen is sifted and moved to enormous cloth bags for the final drying.  You can find both California and Italian Fennel Pollen online.  We get our Tuscan Organic Wild Fennel Pollen from http://www.markethallfoods.com/

Our Wild Organic Fennel Pollen is not inexpensive, but as a chef I would not cook without a stash in our cupboard. But, use fennel pollen sparingly as a pinch goes a long way.

Chef David Darugh

Beechwood Inn

See our Beechwood Inn Recipes