Open That Bottle Night at Beechwood Inn Feb 23 2019

Open that Bottle Night at Beechwood Inn: On OTBN, celebrated the last Saturday of February, bottles all over the world are opened and enjoyed. Choose the wine carefully – you don’t necessarily want to open your “best” wine or most impressive wine, but the wine that has the best memory. Be prepared to share that memory. Here are the wines and the folks that brought them.

Open That Bottle Night at Beechwood Inn Feb 23 2019

Open That Bottle Night at Beechwood Inn Feb 23 2019: National Open that Bottle Night at Beechwood Inn: On OTBN, celebrated the last Saturday of February, bottles are opened all over the world and enjoyed. With this come memories of great vacations, or bittersweet moments. One must choose the wine carefully – you don’t necessarily want to open your “best” wine or most impressive wine, but the wine that has the best memory. Be prepared to share that memory.

Feb 23: Open That Bottle Night at Beechwood Inn

About Open That Bottle Night:

Whether it’s the only bottle in the house or one bottle among thousands, just about all wine lovers have that very special wine that they always mean to open, but never do. This is why “Tastings” columnists Dorothy J. Gaiter and John Brecher invented Open That Bottle Night, the world-wide celebration of friends, family and memories during which all of us finally drink that wine that is otherwise simply too special to open. http://guides.wsj.com/wine/entertaining-and-celebrating-with-wine/open-that-bottle-night/

On OTBN, which is celebrated on the last Saturday of February every year, thousands of bottles all over the world are released from their prison and enjoyed. With them come memories of great vacations, long-lost loved ones and bittersweet moments. Wine is more than the liquid in the bottle, it’s about history, geography, relationships and all of the things that are really important in life.

For open that bottle night what you should select is not necessarily the most expensive wine in your inventory, but the bottle that with the most memories, and you should share that special thought with your friends.

While I urge people to open older bottles and not let them die of old age in the back of the cellar.  I try to do that because no one is promised tomorrow. But I still have way too many bottles that I just haven’t brought myself to open. The point is to open these gems with someone you care about and celebrate the memories that are in that bottle. Make them the occasion. Recognizing that sometimes it takes a village to do something difficult, Dorothy and John set a date, the last Saturday in February, for this global celebration of friendship, love and wine. This year, it’s February 23.

Anthony Gismondi (gismondionwine.com, twitter @The Spitter), who writes about wine for the Vancouver Sun, had a nudge that he could not ignore on Jan. 13, 2018 while vacationing in Hawaii. The nudge, a message that flashed on his IWatch, read: BALLISTIC MISSILE THREAT INBOUND TO HAWAII. SEEK IMMEDIATE SHELTER. THIS IS NOT A DRILL.  Anthony said “I always imagined myself heading for the wine cellar to grab those special bottles but in fact it never crossed my mind in those 38 minutes and, now that I have a second chance, I’m going to change my strategy and start drinking those special bottles soon.”

I’ve been looking at my cellar and all the old wines that need drinking and wondering what am I waiting for. My tastes have changed over the last forty-five years but I still feel a strong attachment to the wines I originally bought. I had no idea they would end up in the back of a cellar forgotten more than neglected. Last year Gayle and I made a vow to start drinking the oldest wines in my cellar, and while some are past their prime, others surprise.

If you plan to participate in Open That Bottle Night, here are some tips to help you make the most of it.

  1. Choose the wine. This is the all-important first step. You don’t necessarily want to open your “best” wine or your most impressive wine, but the wine that means the most to you, the one that you would simply never open otherwise. You’re looking for a bottle full of memories.
  2. Stand older wine up (away from light and heat, of course) for a few days before you plan to open it — say, on Wednesday. This will allow the sediment, if there is some, to sink to the bottom.
  3. Both reds and whites are often better closer to cellar temperature (around 55 degrees) than today’s room temperature.
  4. With an older bottle, the cork may break easily. The best opener for a cork like that is one with two prongs, but it requires some skill. You have some time to practice using one. Be prepared for the possibility that a fragile cork may fall apart with a regular corkscrew. If that happens, have a carafe and a coffee filter handy. Just pour enough through the coffee filter to catch the cork.
  5. Otherwise, do not decant. It’s safe to assume that these are old and fragile wines. Air could quickly dispel what’s left of them. If the wine does need to breathe, you should have plenty of time for that throughout the evening.
  6. Have a backup wine ready for your special meal, in case your old wine really has gone bad.
  7. If you are having an OTBN party, ask everyone to say a few words about the significance of the wine they brought. This really is what OTBN is all about, sharing.
  8. Serve dinner. Open the wine and immediately take a sip. If it’s truly, irretrievably bad — meaning vinegar — you will know it right away.
  9. Enjoy the wine for what it is, not what it might someday be or might once have been.

Guest Wine Contributions – February 24 2018

David & Jennifer Cunningham – 2010 Grgich Hills Zinfandel. Co-fermented the Zinfandel with a touch of Petite Sirah to add complexity and structure, and then aged the wine in large oak casks so the flavors are well integrated but not overwhelmed by oak.

FLAVOR:  strawberries, red plums, orange zest, and a hint of white pepper balanced tannins, subtle smoke wafting from the fall forest, sweet cigar, and garden herbs..
FOOD PAIRINGS:  the perfect match for grilled meats, lasagna, pizza topped with tomato sauce, and beef stews

  David and Gayle Darugh – 2000 Mondavi Reserve Cabernet

Cabernet Sauvignon.  This was the first vintage made in the new Kalon Cellar marking Mondavi’s 90th birthday.   Fruit for this Cabernet Reserve contains over 50% from the Kalon Vineyard and a total of 50% from the Oakville appellation.

AROMA: Creme de cassis, green tobacco, meat juice, stony soil
FLAVOR:  Tea, blackberry, mushroom, chocolate, vanilla and mint..
FOOD PAIRINGS: Beef, Lamb, Game, Mature and hard Cheeses, Poultry.

 Bill and Carolyn Gaik –  1989 Chateau Pichon-Longueville Baron Chalet de Paulliac, Red Bourdeaux Blend

AROMA: huge, smoky, chocolatey, cassis aromas intermingled with scents of toasty oak FLAVOR:  Loads of elegant dark fruit, wet grass, plums, tobacco, cedar. Really smooth mouthfeel with soft round tannins.
FOOD PAIRINGS:  veal, pork, beef, lamb, duck, game, roast chicken, roasted, braised and grilled dishes. Chateau Pichon Lalande is also good when matched with Asian dishes, rich fish courses like tuna, mushrooms and pasta.

Kevin & Susan Harmon – 2014 Banshee, Cabernet Sauvignon

AROMA: Dark plum, cocoa, blackberry and sage aromas

FLAVOR:  dark-chocolate-covered cherry, macerated strawberry, wild herbs, and minerals
FOOD PAIRINGS:  Asian chicken or pork salad, grilled or roasted cruciferous vegetables,

 Fred & Karen Luckfield – 1983 Château LaFite, Red Bourdeaux Blend

AROMA: Graphite, pain grille, black and red fruits, minerals and roasted herbs
FLAVOR:  Blackberry, black plums, cassis, cedar, and cherries, merge with smooth and silky balanced tannins, subtle smoke wafting from the fall forest, sweet cigar, and garden herbs..
FOOD PAIRINGS: Chili & Hot Spicy, Potato, White Rice, Mushrooms, Pasta, Pork, Salami & Prosciutto, Pungent Cheese, Lamb, Tomato-Based, Onion, Shallot, Garlic, Beef, Hard Cheese, Venison .

Fred & Karen Luckfield –1985 Château LaTour, Red Bourdeaux Blend

AROMA: rusty, earthy, black cherries, full body, round smooth and complex,
FLAVOR:  Loads of elegant dark fruit, wet grass, plums, tobacco, cedar. Really smooth mouthfeel with soft round tannins.
FOOD PAIRINGS:  Beef, Lamb, Game, Poultry.

Laura  & Mike McBurnett – 2011 Adelaiea, The Don,  Paso Robles, CA

Touriga 71%, Tinta Cao 24%, Souzao 5%

AROMA: Bing cherries, grenadine, rose petals, allspice, milk chocolate
FLAVOR:  dried cherries, fruitcake, pomegranate, sweet cedar
FOOD PAIRINGS:  flourless chocolate cake, coconut flan, cranberry-maple pudding cake with orange zest . Drink now through 2026.

Planted at the entrance to the winery, on a west facing slope with sandy loam soils, Bobcat Crossing was established in 2001. Named after co-founder Don Van Steenwyk, this is Adelaida’s interpretation of a Vintage Port.

Cindy & Stuart Morris – 2013 Klinker Brick Zinfandel, Maris aVineyard, Old Vine, Lodi, CA

88-year-old single vineyard block

AROMA:  berries and fresh vanilla bean laced with clove and spice. Flavors of black cherry, blackberry, cardamom and  pepper.

FLAVORS:  Sweet berries and vanilla predominate..

FOOD PAIRINGS:  Grilled ribeye. Lamb poultry

Kevin &    Rodke – 2013 Cloak & Dagger, “The Assassin”, Paso Robles, Central Coast, CA

Cabernet Sauvignon  67%, Syrah 33%

AROMA: Black raspberry and blackberry notes mix with vanilla and baked licorice.
FLAVOR:  Dense, dark mocha and black currants
FOOD PAIRINGS:  flourless chocolate cake, coconut flan, cranberry-maple pudding cake with orange zest .

Best in Class – 2016 San Francisco Chronicle Wine Competition

Drink now through 2028

Formerly bottled as Howell Mountain

Bob & Beth St. Jean – 2013 Chateau St. Jean, Cabernet Sauvignon, Sonoma, CA, Cabernet Sauvignon 100% Cabernet

AROMA:  Blackberry, black plum and spice
FLAVOR:  Black cherry and blackberry expand in waves around the oak and

FOOD PAIRINGS:  Generous cuts of meat, preferably grilled.

Bennet Williams –  2010 Haut-Bages Liberal

Cabernet Sauvignon 71%, Merlot 29%

AROMA:  Blackberry and currant aromas, with some licorice
FLAVOR:  Blackberry, black plums, cassis, cedar, and cherries, merge with smooth and silky balanced tannins, subtle smoke wafting from the fall forest, sweet cigar, and garden herbs..
FOOD PAIRINGS:  Beef and venison.

Open That Bottle Night at Beechwood Inn

Learn more about Open That Bottle Night

http://guides.wsj.com/wine/entertaining-and-celebrating-with-wine/open-that-bottle-night/